This page contains a categorized list of links to resources and information on a variety of topics relating to addiction and recovery. These links will take you outside of the Just Love More website, and as such they are provided strictly for informational purposes. Just Love More is not responsible for the accuracy or continued availability of content contained on these links.

Recovery Support

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA): an international fellowship of men and women who have had a drinking problem. It is nonprofessional, self-supporting, multiracial, apolitical, and available almost everywhere. There are no age or education requirements. Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about his or her drinking problem.

Co-dependents Anonymous (CoDa): a fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is to develop healthy relationships. The only requirement for membership is a desire for healthy and loving relationships.

Crystal Meth Anonymous (CMA): a fellowship of people who share their experience, strength and hope with each other, so they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from addiction to crystal meth.

Food Addicts Anonymous (FA): a fellowship of men and women who are willing to recover from the disease of food addiction.  Sharing our experience, strength, and hope with others allows us to recover from this disease One Day at a Time.

Gamblers Anonymous (GA): a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from a gambling problem.

Game Quitters: exists to provide the best tools, resources, and support for people of all ages and backgrounds, who struggle to quit playing video games.

LifeRing: an organization of people who share practical experiences and sobriety support.

Narcotics Anonymous (NA): a nonprofit fellowship or society of men and women for whom drugs had become a major problem.

Moderation Management: designed for people who believe their drinking has become problematic and want to moderate it before it gets harder to control. Participants are asked first to abstain from alcohol for 30 days, and during this time they are encouraged to think about how drinking has affected their lives and under which circumstances they had been drinking. After the 30 days of abstinence, participants are given guidelines about how to drink moderately. Participants who have trouble keeping their drinking moderate are encouraged to consider complete abstinence.

Self Mutilators Anonymous (SMA): a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other, that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from physical self-mutilation.

Sex Addicts Anonymous (SAA): a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other to they may overcome their sexual addiction and help others recover from sexual addiction or dependency.

SMART Recovery: an abstinence-based, not-for-profit organization with a sensible self-help program for people having problems with drinking and using.

SOS: a nonprofit network of autonomous, non-professional local groups, dedicated solely to helping individuals achieve and maintain sobriety/abstinence from alcohol and drug addiction, food addiction and more.

Women for Sobriety: an organization whose purpose is to help all women find their individual path to recovery through discovery of self, gained by sharing experiences, hopes and encouragement with other women in similar circumstances. We are an abstinence-based self-help program for women facing issues of alcohol or drug addiction.

Support for Loved Ones

Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACA): a 12-step program of men and women who grew up in dysfunctional homes.

Al-Anon: help and hope for family and friends of alcoholics

Alateen: part of the Al-Anon family, Alateen meetings are for younger people

Gam-Anon: 12-step self-help fellowship of men and women who have been affected by the gambling problem of another.

Nar-Anon: 12-step program for family and friends of addicts

Harm Reduction Resources

Georgia

Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition: a community-based wellness organization committed to promoting health and dignity by reducing the impact of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, STI and substance use in vulnerable communities by building relationships with vulnerable people. AHRC offers syringe exchanges three times each week in the Atlanta Metro.

Georgia Overdose Prevention: The organization that created and advocated for the passage of the Georgia 911 Medical Amnesty Law. This important law ensures that neither the victim nor anyone who calls 911 for assistance with an overdose can be arrested, charged, or prosecuted for small amounts of drugs, alcohol, or drug paraphernalia if the evidence was obtained as a result of seeking medical assistance. Georgia Overdose Prevention now focuses on education, implementation, and the development of resources to support the law. They additionally provide Narcan kits for overdose reversal along with training on how to use them.